Maintaining the indoor air quality (IAQ) inside your Austin, Texas, home requires vigilance and effort. While everyone needs clean, fresh air to breathe, high IAQ is especially crucial if someone in your household has asthma, allergies, or other lung conditions. You do all you can to keep your home clean and free of irritants, but there may be other irritants, like volatile organic compounds (VOCs), in your home that you’re not even aware of. Read on to learn more about what VOCs are and what you can do about them.

What Are Volatile Organic Compounds?

Volatile organic compounds are a common source of inflammation, especially for those with breathing conditions. VOCs are gases that emanate from certain solid or liquid products in your home. These chemicals can cause both immediate and long-term health issues. Because so many household items give off VOCs, these compounds tend to be more concentrated inside your home than outside. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that the level of VOCs indoors at a typical home may be up to 10 times higher than in the surrounding outdoor environment.

Which Products Contain Organic Compounds?

Everyday household products like paint, cleaning chemicals and scented candles all contain organic compounds. Organic compounds are found in gasoline and other forms of fuel, as well, and all of these substances can release VOCs when you’re using them and, to a lesser extent, when they’re in storage. For people struggling with severe allergies or asthma, this off-gassing process presents a critical health challenge.

One of the simplest ways to reduce the concentration of VOCs in the air inside your Austin, Texas, home is to install an air purifier or cleaner. At Del’s Heating & Air Conditioning, we recommend the Reme Halo because of its ability to remove up to 99.99% of impurities. Call us today at 512-236-5830 to learn more about this and other options we offer to help you battle VOCs and let everyone in your home breathe easier.

Image provided by iStock

Pin It on Pinterest